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Pharm.D./M.S.B.I. Concurrent Degrees

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Concurrent Pharm.D. and M.S.B.I. Degrees

Nova Southeastern University offers students the opportunity to enroll and complete the Doctor of Pharmacy (Pharm.D.) degree in the College of Pharmacy concurrently with the Master of Science in Biomedical Informatics (M.S.B.I.) in the College of Osteopathic Medicine. Students must complete the Doctor of Pharmacy degree within 6 academic years of enrollment. Students must complete the Master of Science in Biomedical Informatics degree within 7 years of enrollment. A schedule of courses has been developed that allows the student to successfully complete the concurrent degrees simultaneously within a 4 year period of study. Students selected for the concurrent programs will be expected to complete additional credits during the 2nd, 3rd and 4th years as well as summers following the 1st and 2nd year of the pharmacy curriculum. In the case of conflict of course schedules or expectations, the Doctor of Pharmacy degree is considered the primary degree to be completed and the Master of Science in Biomedical Informatics is considered the secondary. All efforts will be made to blend the classes and assignments to optimize student efforts.

Criteria for Acceptance into Concurrent Degree Program

  1. Possession of a Bachelors, Masters or Doctorate degree
  2. Progression in the PharmD program
    • Completion of at least P1 year
    • Academic standing of > 80% GPA
    • Commitment to additional academic workload

Admissions Procedures

  1. Concurrent degree programs are introduced to the student during orientation of P1 year
  2. College of Pharmacy students wishing to purse concurrent Doctor of Pharmacy and Master of Science in Biomedical Informatics must apply on-line for admission to the M.S.B.I. program by March 1 and submit a letter of interest to the Associate Dean for Professional Programs by March 1.
  3. Student interviews with Associate Dean for Professional Programs
  4. Associate Dean for Professional Programs submits list of accepted students to Admissions Department, Master of Science in Biomedical Informatics by April 1.
  5. Application reviewed by M.S.B.I. admissions committee
  6. Upon admission, an M.S.B.I. advisor will be assigned to each student

Requirements for Graduation

M.S.B.I. Degree

The successful student will complete a minimum of 43 hours of credit within the Master of Science in Biomedical Informatics Program including a core curriculum of 31 hours and 12 hours must be completed from a group of elective courses. Students who are concurrently enrolled in the Pharm.D. and M.S.B.I. degree programs will meet the requirement for MI 5205 - Program Evaluation in Health Information Technology by completing PHRC 5350 - Research Design and Statistics. 

Pharm.D. Degree

Students who are concurrently enrolled in the in the Pharm.D. and M.S.B.I. degree programs will meet the Pharm.D. elective requirement by completing MI 6410 - Consumer Health Informatics and MI 6404 - Special Topics in Health Informatics. PHRC 7690 APPE – Selective III in the field of pharmacy informatics will be met by completing the MI 7000 Health Informatics Practicum. 

Curriculum

FIRST YEAR

Fall Semester

No. of Credits: 0

Pre-Requisite: None

Description: This online course will provide an overview of medical terminology. Upon completion student will demonstrate proficiency in medical terminology required to be successful in pharmacy education.

No. of Credits: 3 towards Pharm.D.

Pre-Requisite: None

Description: Pharmaceutics I emphasizes the theories and applications of underlying physicochemical principles in preparation of pharmaceutical dosage form. It also emphasizes biopharmaceutics principles, as well as drug development and approval processes.

No. of Credits: 1 towards Pharm.D.

Pre-Requisite: None

Description: Pharmacy Calculations includes the study of different methods used by the phar¬macist in the process of solving the mathematical problems typically found in the practice of the profes¬sion of pharmacy. This course also emphasizes metric and common systems conversions, fundamentals of measurements, percentages, dose calculation, specific gravity, dilution, concentration, and dosage adjustment.

No. of Credits: 3 towards Pharm.D.

Pre-Requisite: None

Description: This is the first course in the pharmacodynamics sequence. This course applies the principles of organic chemistry in order to understand drug actions at the molecular level. It introduces students to the basic pharmacokinetic principles (absorption, distribution, metabolism and elimination) as it pertains to pharmacology. The remainder of the course covers physiological receptors and key pharmacogenomic concepts.

No. of Credits: 2 towards Pharm.D.

Pre-Requisite: None

Description: This course covers concepts related to the structure and function of the United States Health Care System. Emphasis is placed on the analysis of issues associated with personnel; the finance, organization, and regulation of the health care system; and the provision of pharmacy services in the context of the healthcare enterprise.

No. of Credits: 4 towards Pharm.D.

Pre-Requisite: None

Description: This two semester course reviews the physical and chemical processes occurring in the human body that are responsible for the maintenance of health and the pathophysiology of disease. Topics covered during the first semester include membrane and cellular physiology, genetic diseases, and the physiology and pathophysiology of the integumentary, musculoskeletal, nervous, lymphatic, and cardiovascular systems. The second semester (PHRC 4420) addresses the physiology and pathophysiology of the digestive, urinary, respiratory, endocrine, and reproductive systems.

No. of Credits: 1 towards Pharm.D.

Pre-Requisite: None

Description: Students will achieve a basic understanding of leadership, service, and professional activities as they relate to the practice of pharmacy. This course will provide an introduction to, and overview of, organized pharmacy on a local, state and national level, with a focus on professionalism. Students will be exposed to opportunities for community engagement hours within the profession and the university and will be expected to become involved in areas that support their future professional goals. Students will learn from a combination of lectures, service activities, and reflective exercises. Students are expected to participate as team members, to improve listening and observation skills and improve professional demeanor.

No. of Credits: 4 towards Pharm.D.

Pre-Requisite: None

Description: Covers the structure, function, and metabolism of lipids, proteins, carbohydrates, nucleic acids. Their interactions to compose body systems and their relevance in pharmaceutical applications will be emphasized.

Semester Total: 18 Pharm.D. Credits (8 courses)

Winter Semester

No. of Credits: 2 towards Pharm.D.

Pre-Requisite: PHRC 4110, PHRC 4200

Description: This course deals with the study of tradi¬tional and basic pharmaceutical dosage forms and their routes of administration. This course also emphasizes the fundamental characteristics of each dosage form and their routes of administration. The dosage forms that are examined in the course include: oral liquids, parenterals, solids, molded solids, semisolids, nasal, pulmonary, buccal, sublingual, otic, ophthalmic, transdermal, and controlled release dosage forms and systems.

No. of Credits: 1 towards Pharm.D.

Pre-Requisite: PHRC 4110, PHRC 4200

Co-Requisite: PHRC 4120

Description: This course is a compounding laboratory for the basic pharmaceutical formulations that can be prepared and dispensed in a pharmacy setting. Preparation and dispensing of pharmaceutical solutions, emulsions, suspensions, semi-solids, and solid dosage forms are studied in the laboratory. Basic parenteral procedures and calculations are included.

No. of Credits: 3 towards Pharm.D.

Pre-Requisite: PHRC 4210, PHRC 4410

Co-Requisite: PHRC 4420

Description: This is the second course in the pharmacodynamics sequence. This course applies the principles of biochemistry, physiology, and pathophysiology to understand drug actions at the receptor, cellular, and system levels under normal physiological and pathological conditions. It focuses on the drugs that act on the autonomic nervous system, cardiovascular system, and blood components.

No. of Credits: 4 towards Pharm.D.

Pre-Requisite: None

Description: The principles involved in drug absorption, distribution, metabolism and elimination in the body are discussed. Mechanisms and rates of these processes are covered. Examines how the fate of drugs in the body is influenced by physiologic and biochemical processes. Examines the mathematical techniques involved in the graph analysis of drug blood level kinetic curves to determine pharmacokinetic parameters. This course describes the application of basic pharmacokinetic principles in therapeutic drug monitoring and in toxicology.

No. of Credits: 4 towards Pharm.D.

Pre-Requisite: None

Description: This two semester course reviews the physical and chemical processes occurring in the human body that are responsible for the maintenance of health and the pathophysiology of disease. The second semester reviews the physiology and pathophysiology of the digestive, urinary, respiratory, endocrine, and reproductive systems.

No. of Credits: 2 towards Pharm.D.

Pre-Requisite: None

Description: Drug information resources provides a detailed review of the fundamental tools necessary to identify the quality of health care information available in primary, secondary, and tertiary resources. Students learn the strengths and weaknesses of the various references and how to apply their use in practice. Active learning experiences include retrieving scientific literature, utilizing electronic resources, performing literature searches, and formulating responses to drug information requests. Students also learn fundamental aspects of health informatics including basic terminology and tools (e.g., electronic health records, e-prescribing, clinical decision support systems), the role of data analytics and visualization, and both the benefits and limitations associated with use of health information technology.

No. of Credits: 1 towards Pharm.D.

Pre-Requisite: None

Description: Students will achieve a basic understanding of leadership, service, and professional activities as they relate to the practice of pharmacy. This course will provide an introduction to, and overview of, organized pharmacy on a local, state and national level, with a focus on leadership. Students will be exposed to opportunities for community engagement hours within the profession and the university and will be expected to become involved in areas that support their future professional goals. Students will learn from a combination of lectures, service activities, and reflective exercises. Students are expected to participate as team members, to improve listening and observation skills and improve professional demeanor.

Semester Total: 17 Pharm.D. Credits (7 courses)

SECOND YEAR 

Summer Semester

No. of Credits: 1.5 towards Pharm.D.

Co-Requisite: PHRC 5380

Description: Students are exposed to the role and responsibilities of the professionally oriented community pharmacist and the importance of effective communi¬cation between pharmacist, patients, and other health care providers. On-site experience provides basic knowledge of the drug distribution process in a community pharmacy. Legal, ethical, and practice issues in pharmacy are discussed during classroom activities.

No. of Credits: 1.5 towards Pharm.D.

Co-Requisite: HRC 5580

Description: This course is a continuation of PHRC 5580. Students are exposed to the role and responsibilities of the professionally oriented community pharmacist and the importance of effective communication between pharmacist, patients, and other health care providers. On-site experience provides basic knowledge of the drug distribution process in a community pharmacy. Legal, ethical, and practice issues in pharmacy are discussed during classroom activities.

No. of Credits: 3 towards M.S.B.I.

Pre-Requisite: None

Description: This on-line, interactive course is an introductory survey of the discipline of biomedical informatics. This course will introduce the student to the use of computers for processing, organizing, retrieving and utilizing biomedical information at the molecular, biological system, clinical and healthcare organization levels. The course is targeted at individuals with varied backgrounds including medical, nursing, pharmacy, administration, and computer science. The course will describe essential concepts in biomedical informatics that are derived from medicine, computer science and the social sciences.

Learning Objectives:

  • Demonstrate in writing and verbally a basic understanding of the learned concepts of biomedical informatics and their direct application to healthcare.
  • Demonstrate the ability to compare, select, apply and integrate multiple technologies in and across a healthcare organization.
  • Discuss key legal and ethical issues that must be considered when implementing biomedical technology and supporting information systems.
  • Differentiate multiple methods to evaluate the costs versus benefits of implementing biomedical information systems.
  • Produce evidence of a forward thinking ability to stay current in biomedical informatics.

No. of Credits: 3 towards M.S.B.I.

Pre-Requisite: None

Description: This course covers from basic to intermediate knowledge of the concept, the design and the implementation of database applications in healthcare. Students will study tools and data models for designing databases such as E-R Model and SQL. The course also covers Relational DBMS systems such as SQL Server, Access, Oracle and mySQL. Besides, database connectivity design (essential in data-driven web development) and database administration will also be introduced.

Students will practice designing, developing and implementing a test relational online health IT database application (myHealth) through a comprehensive project that contains the above topics.

Learning Objectives:

At the end of the course, student will be able to:

  • Identify the key elements of database management system and applications in healthcare.
  • Plan, document, and design a medical informatics database application.
  • Identify and model healthcare database application using ER Model and query against the database with SQL.
  • Identify the key concepts and process in order to SQL server, Access, Oracle or mySQL DBMS systems to build up a data-driven web application.
  • Identify the basic concepts of database administration and data warehouse for decision support system (DSS).

Semester Total: 3 Pharm.D. Credits (2 courses), 6 M.S.B.I. Credits (2 courses)

Fall Semester

No. of Credits: 2 towards Pharm.D.

Pre-Requisite: None

Description: This course is intended to teach patient assessment in ambulatory and inpatient settings. Clinical interview and physical examination techniques will be explained and demonstrated, with a video lecture series assessed via an electronic course management system. During the active learning portion of the course, students will demonstrate these techniques. Charting, interpretation of findings, and evaluation of common clinical entities, especially as related to medications, will be integrated into these activities. This course is taught as an institute.

No. of Credits: 4 towards Pharm.D.

Pre-Requisite: PHRC 4210, PHRC 4410, and PHRC 4420

Description: The third course in the Pharmacodynamics sequence of classes. This course applies the principles of biochemistry, physiology, and pathophysiology to understand drug actions at the recep¬tor, cellular, and system levels under normal physiological and pathologi¬cal conditions. It covers agents used to treat metabolic disorders such as diabetes, and drugs influencing the endocrine system. This course also introduces CNS pharmacology as it pertains to the pharmacological treatment of psychological disorders.

No. of Credits: 2 towards Pharm.D.

Pre-Requisite: None

Description: Sociological, psychological, and behavioral aspects of pharmacy practice are discussed to help students understand patients perspectives of health and illness, as well as their implications for pharmacists¿ roles. Variability in patients individual needs, relationships with healthcare providers, and medication use behavior are explored.

No. of Credits: 3 towards Pharm.D. and M.S.B.I. (Accepted as MI 5205 - Program Evaluation in Health Information Technology)

Pre-Requisite: None

Description: Different aspects of research methodology and design are covered in this course. Students are expected to survey statistical applications to understand and evaluate clinical, biomedical, and healthcare services research.

No. of Credits: 2 towards Pharm.D.

Pre-Requisite: None

Description: This course provides a framework for students to gain knowledge of the interplay between pharmacy and the law. It provides practical guidance to act lawfully, professionally, and ethically. The material covers federal and state statutes, rules and regulations, and case law with emphasis on understanding the laws affecting the practice of community and institutional pharmacy.

No. of Credits: 3 towards Pharm.D.

Pre-Requisite: None

Description: The overarching goal of the pharmacotherapy curricular component is to integrate concepts from previous courses in the doctor of pharmacy curriculum, including pathophysiology, pharmacokinetics, calculations, biopharmaceutics, and pharmacodynamics, into the selection of pharmacotherapy for specific disease states in specific patients and populations. The pharmacotherapy curricular components are divided into four courses. Pharmacotherapy I is the prerequisite for the remainder of the sequence as it provides the foundation in clinical pharmacokinetic theory and application, introductory concepts required to develop, evaluate, monitor, and document a pharmacotherapeutic plan, and common health promotion areas pertinent to pharmacists.

No. of Credits: 3 towards Pharm.D.

Pre-Requisite: None

Description: Covers the underlying nature of infectious microorganisms. It emphasizes cause, prevention, and control of infectious diseases; immunology; mycology; parasitology; virology; bacteriology.

No. of Credits: 3 towards M.S.B.I.

Pre-Requisite: None

Description: This course covers major concepts, systems and methodology in managing health care information systems. Topics will include concepts in: system implementation and support, information architecture, IT governance in health care, information systems standards, organizing IT services, strategic planning, IT alignment with the health care facility, and management's role in major IT initiatives.

Learning Objectives:

The conclusion of the course students will be able to:

  • Design strategies for management in acquiring, planning, and implementing major health care IT initiatives
  • Implement sound project management methodologies in health care IT systems, which are critical to the strategic plan of the facility
  • Evaluate technologies such as electronic medical records, enterprise resource planning, or enterprise collaboration systems, which can facilitate a health care facility's business processes
  • Integrate the roles of stakeholders, IT staff, and management in designing and implementing health information technology projects
  • Analyze legal compliance requirements that organizations must comply with while implementing and supporting health care information systems. (i.e. HIPAA regulations and JCAHO standards)
  • Evaluate health care information technology systems, projects, and provider requirements.

Semester Total: 19 Pharm.D. Credits (7 courses), 6 M.S.B.I. Credits (2 courses)

Winter Semester

No. of Credits: 3 towards Pharm.D.

Pre-Requisite: None

Description: This course discusses the use of nonprescription therapies including drug and nondrug treatments. Patient education information, potential drug interactions, and recommended treatments will also be discussed.

No. of Credits: 4 towards Pharm.D.

Pre-Requisite: PHRC 4210, PHRC 4410, and PHRC 4420

Description:Catalogue Course Description: The fourth course in the Pharmacodynamics sequence of classes. This course applies the principles of biochemistry, physiology, and pathophysiology to understand drug actions at the recep¬tor, cellular, and system levels under normal physiological and pathologi¬cal conditions. This course initially focuses on drugs acting either peripherally or centrally to treat pain and inflammation. The remainder of the course covers anti-infective agents including the antibacterials, antifungals, and antivirals.

No. of Credits: 2 towards Pharm.D.

Pre-Requisite: PHRC 4300 and PHRC 5300

Description: This course focuses on communication models, effective patient interaction, and the role of communication in modern pharmacy practice. Specific communications strategies to help foster therapeutic relationships with patients in various settings are presented. Issues related to conflict resolution, active listening, distortion and bias, and cultural competency are explored.

No. of Credits: 5 towards Pharm.D.

No. of Credits: 2 towards Pharm.D.

Pre-Requisite: None

Description: 

Provides a framework to guide the student through the thought processes necessary to evaluate and synthesize primary literature using an evidenced-based approach. Through didactic and application based learning, students become proficient in literature evaluation techniques to assess therapeutic value and applicability in patient care.

No. of Credits: 1 towards Pharm.D.

Pre-Requisite: None

Description: This is the first of three in the patient care management (PCM) sequence of laboratories. PCM I covers the following specific Pharmacotherapeutic topics, parallel to those in PHRC 5420: anticoagulation, cardiovascular disease, renal disease (including anemia), pediatrics, medication safety and critical care (including adult cardiac life support). Students will have the opportunity to hone communication skills, in both simulated inpatient and outpatient settings. Team building activities are incorporated throughout the course to enhance professionalism and communication skills amongst healthcare professionals. The laboratory uses realistic, integrated patient cases that allow students to draw upon knowledge acquired from all other courses in the curriculum. Cases encompass therapeutic, communication, legal, and social behavioral issues. Patient care plans are systematically documented and communicated based on patient cases. This course emphasizes decision-making processes that allow pharmacy students to integrate their knowledge and skills in an interactive learning environment. Physical assessment techniques and interpretation are interwoven into the laboratory sessions. The weekly classroom component of the course, Theory, provides students with interprofessional interactions, patient encounters and additional active learning exercises to compliment laboratory activities. Students are assessed for their knowledge of commonly used medications throughout the course.

No. of Credits: 3

Pre-Requisite: None

Description: The course will cover concepts, applications and techniques of data security in healthcare system. Topics include introduction, design principles, intrusion detection, policy assurance, attacks and penetration, access control, risks and vulnerabilities, database security, web security, cryptography, identity theft, viruses, authentication technologies, personnel and physical security issues, and issues of law and privacy. Areas of particular focus include secure healthcare system design, implementation, data encryption and decryption, attacks, and techniques for responding to security breaches.

Learning Objectives:

Upon completion of this course, students will have gained knowledge of information security and healthcare information security. Students will be able to use security tools and devices to encrypt data to enhance access control and to increase application and system security.

  • Name Information Security (InfoSec) principles and approaches.
  • Prioritize threats to healthcare information resources.
  • Define an information security strategy and architecture.
  • Plan for and respond to intruders in a healthcare information system.
  • Demonstrate comprehensive knowledge of public cryptography and skills of steganography.
  • Apply encryption techniques for data and emails.

Semester Total: 17 Pharm.D. Credits (6 courses), 3 M.S.B.I. Credits (1 course)

THIRD YEAR 

Summer Semester

No. of Credits: 2 towards Pharm.D.

Pre-Requisite: PHRC 5420

Description: Students are exposed to various aspects of institutional pharmacy practice including drug storage, drug security, and policies and procedures. On-site experience provides basic knowledge of the drug distribution process in a hospital setting. Activities will include prescription preparation, using a unit dose system, use of references, and inventory management.

No. of Credits: 2 towards Pharm.D.

Pre-Requisite: PHRC 5680

Description: Introduction to the application of skills, concepts, and knowledge acquired in the didactic component of the curriculum in institutional pharmacy settings. This course promotes the development of pharmacy practice skills and furthers the development of communication skills. On-site experience enables students to prepare for advanced practice experiences.

No. of Credits: 3 towards M.S.B.I.

Pre-Requisite: None

Description: The need to create effective, new solutions and innovative interventions to deliver quality patient care outside of the traditional medical setting is at the forefront of society today. The basis of this course will be providing a solid educational foundation for systems design & analysis, as it relates to current and future healthcare systems. In addition, this course will build upon the fundamental systems design & analysis to explore current and future healthcare systems that will include integration of disparate clinical principles healthcare systems, mobile technologies , as well as a combination of remote-monitoring technology, sensors, and online communications and intelligence to improve patient adherence, engagement and clinical outcomes.

Learning Objectives:

  • In the role of a systems analyst, investigate and demonstrate the foundations of systems analysis & design theory and applications as it relates to healthcare systems.
  • Demonstrate skills needed to successfully function as a healthcare systems analyst by Identify key stakeholders, discover / document requirements, convert requirements into vendor specifications and evaluate vendor’s proposals, document Service Level Agreement (SLA), document / coordinate testing, training, and implementation including SLA.
  • Determine appropriate measurement methods to evaluate and compare mobile technologies based on user requirements, available / upgradable infrastructure, and application specific software / hardware in the healthcare marketplace.
  • Define role of stakeholders as users / customers of healthcare information systems, and give examples of each.
  • Manage multiple roles of business drivers and technology drivers, as they relate to the healthcare industry.
  • Distinguish between knowledge, process, and communications goals for healthcare systems.
  • Employ the essential phases of systems development that includes purpose, inputs, and outputs of a healthcare system.
  • Objectively judge and evaluate wireless networking in healthcare systems from a systems analysis & design perspective.
  • Incorporate 10 basic principles of systems development as it relates to healthcare systems.
  • Use a variety of automated tools for systems development in creation of state of the art healthcare systems.

No. of Credits: 3 towards M.S.B.I.

Pre-Requisite: None

Description: This course introduces the fundamental principles of project management from an information technology perspective, with an emphasis on healthcare industry applications. Fundamental aspects of project management are covered including project integration, the management of scope, time, cost, quality, human resources, communications, and risks. Discussion also includes project management software as well as organizational management aspects such as project planning, team building, organizational structure, and control mechanisms.

Learning Objectives:

Students will apply newly learned project management knowledge and skills to course assignments, thus after completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Describe the genesis of project management and its importance to improving successful HIT projects in the healthcare setting;
  2. Apply project management terms and methods;
  3. Apply project management concepts by working on a group project as project manager or active team member;
  4. Use Microsoft Project 2013 software to help plan and manage a project;
  5. Evaluate how decisions are made by health care leadership impacting organizational processes affecting health information systems;
  6. Develop strategies to identify options for project managers working on HIT projects that allow for adaption to changes.

Semester Total: 4 Pharm.D. Credits (2 courses), 6 M.S.B.I. Credits (2 courses)

Fall Semester

No. of Credits: 3 towards Pharm.D.

Pre-Requisite: None

Description: The fifth course in the Pharmacodynamics sequence of classes. This course applies the principles of biochemistry, physiology, and pathophysiology to understand drug actions at the receptor, cellular, and system levels under normal physiological and pathological conditions. It covers antineoplastic agents and immunomodulators. The remainder of the course introduces students to the principles of toxicology and poison management.

No. of Credits: 3 towards Pharm.D.

Pre-Requisite: PHRC 4300

Description: An overview of management theories, human resources, and financial management applied to pharmacy operations is provided in this course. Elements of supervision, management, and leadership are discussed in an effort to develop skills needed to operate a pharmacy effectively.

No. of Credits: 2 towards Pharm.D.

Pre-Requisite: PHRC 5350

Description: An overview of the theories and methodologies of pharmacoeconomics and outcomes research. Application of the allocation of limited healthcare resources in clinical practice, the pharmaceutical industry, and managed care are explored using examples from the primary literature.

No. of Credits: 6 towards Pharm.D.

Pre-Requisite: None

Description: Pharmacotherapy III is the third of four courses in the pharmacotherapy curricular component. Material presented in this course continues to integrate concepts from previous courses in the curriculum (pathophysiology, pharmacokinetics, calculations, biopharmaceutics, and pharmacodynamics) and builds upon the preceding pharmacotherapy courses. The course is divided into disease-state modules and focuses on the development, monitoring, and evaluation of pharmacotherapeutic plans through application of clinical pharmacokinetic principles, assessment of physical findings, laboratory values, adverse drug effects, drug interactions, and patient education.

No. of Credits: 1 towards Pharm.D.

Pre-Requisite: None

Description: This is the second of three in the patient care management (PCM) sequence of laboratories. PCM II covers the following specific Pharmacotherapeutic topics, parallel to those in PHRC 6430: genitourinary conditions, arthritis, diseases affecting special populations such as geriatric patients, asthma and COPD, endocrine disorders, and mental health. Pain management is also addressed. There is a focus on ambulatory and community pharmacy. The weekly classroom component of the course, Theory, exposes students to interprofessional interactions, patient encounters and additional exercises to compliment laboratory activities. Students will have the opportunity to hone communication skills, in both simulated inpatient and outpatient settings. Team building activities are incorporated throughout the course to enhance professionalism and communication skills amongst healthcare professionals. The laboratory uses realistic, integrated patient cases that allow students to draw upon knowledge acquired from all other courses in the curriculum. Cases encompass therapeutic, communication, legal, and social behavioral issues. Patient care plans are systematically documented and communicated based on patient cases. This course emphasizes decision-making processes that allow pharmacy students to integrate their knowledge and skills in an interactive learning environment. Physical assessment techniques and interpretation are interwoven into the laboratory sessions. The weekly classroom component of the course, Theory, provides students with interprofessional interactions, patient encounters and additional active learning exercises to compliment laboratory activities. Students are assessed for their knowledge of commonly used medications throughout the course.

No. of Credits: 3 towards Pharm.D. and M.S.B.I. (Accepted as PHRE 5203 - Consumer Health Informatics)

Pre-Requisite: None

Description: This course provides an introduction to, and overview of, consumer health informatics, mobile health (mHealth), and social media applications used in healthcare. It explores the development of consumers as ePatients and tools such as personal health records (PHRs), as well as the fluid nature of social media in medicine and the emerging area of mobile health (mHealth). Students will learn from a combination of lectures and a hands-on approach of interacting directly with the tools and technologies discussed.

Learning Objectives:

Upon completing MI 6410, the student will be able to:

  • Demonstrate the roles of social media for consumers and healthcare professionals.
  • Identify strengths and weaknesses of consumer health informatics and mobile health (mHealth) applications (apps) and tools.
  • Apply concepts related to user interface (UI) and user experience (UX) for design of mobile apps and tools for health and wellness.
  • Navigate social media used for information management, public health, and social good.
  • Delineate healthcare risks inherent to patients with consumer health informatics, social media, and mHealth.

No. of Credits: 3 towards M.S.B.I.

Pre-Requisite: None

Description: This course introduces students to theoretical, statistical, and practical concepts underlying modern medical decision making. Students will be provided a review of the multiple methods of knowledge generation for clinical decision support systems (CDSS) and create their own prototype of CDSS. Current implementations of stand-alone and integrated CDSS will be evaluated. Techniques for planning, management, and evaluation of CDSS implementations will be reviewed. Human factors, including work-flow integration, and the ethical, legal and regulatory aspects of CDSS use will be explored, as applicable to commercial implementations in patient care settings. Future models of healthcare, supported by CDSS and evidence-based medicine, will be discussed and reviewed.

Learning Objectives:

Upon completion of this course, the student will comprehend the following issues and objectives:

  • Describe the scope and kinds of clinical decision support systems; analyze CDSS effectiveness in terms of implementing for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes.
  • Evaluate the linkage of CDSS to the basic concepts of evidence-based medicine.
  • Apply practice guidelines for clinical decision support, including commonly-used formalisms and authoring tools for computer-interpretable guidelines.
  • Describe the social and political forces driving implementations of CDSS in the clinical field.
  • Compare and contrast the types of CDSS available in commercial and research implementations.
  • Apply statistical methods and logic concepts, such as probability, regression, Boolean logic, set theory, and inference, to underlying medical decision making.
  • Evaluate at least three methods of knowledge generation for CDSS, including decision trees, neural networks, and Bayesian analysis.
  • Compare the advantages and disadvantages of supervised vs. unsupervised learning methods in data-mining applications.
  • Evaluate how CDSS fold into the overall hospital and/or medical office health information technology environment.
  • Analyze technology and business characteristics of successful CDSS implementations using recent industry cases as guidelines and input to build student's own attributes of an effective CDSS implementation.
  • Recognize business and clinical implementation and maintenance challenges in commercial CDSS projects, as well as possible resolutions to these challenges.
  • Assess risks involved with poor CDSS implementations from the following standpoints: health outcomes, quality of care, medical error rates, and patient and provider satisfaction standpoints.
  • Discuss ethical and regulatory issues involved in design and implementation of CDSS systems.
  • Identify opportunities for use of CDSS in personal health records and shared decision making.
  • Identify a basic clinical problem or an operational situation with the purpose of simulating an expert system to assist clinicians with problem resolution process.
  • Present a full implementation of CDSS with commercially applicable attributes, aimed at solving specific clinical problem or improving clinical workflow.
  • Integrate theoretical and practical knowledge of current and future CDSS learned in class, to apply in healthcare settings.

Total: 18 Pharm.D. Credits (6 courses), 6 M.S.B.I. Credits (2 courses)

Winter Semester

No. of Credits: 2 towards Pharm.D.

Pre-Requisite: PHRC 4300 and PHRC 5300

Description: This course covers public health foundations, concepts, and tools as they apply to pharmacy practice. Social determinants of health, health disparities, and cultural competencies, as well as their impact on population health, are emphasized. Skills related to epidemiology, pharmacoepidemiology, surveillance, and risk assessment are discussed. The course also explores models of pharmacy-run public health programs.

No. of Credits: 6 towards Pharm.D.

Pre-Requisite: PHRC 5410

Description: Pharmacotherapy IV is the fourth and final course in the pharmacotherapy curricular component. Material presented in this course continues to integrate concepts from previous courses in the curriculum (pathophysiology, pharmacokinetics, calculations, biopharmaceutics, and pharmacodynamics) and builds upon the preceding pharmacotherapy courses. The course is divided into disease-state modules and focuses on the development, monitoring, and evaluation of pharmacotherapeutic plans through application of clinical pharmacokinetic principles, assessment of physical findings, laboratory values, adverse drug effects, drug interactions, and patient education. The class concludes with a high-stakes practicum in which students must demonstrate competence in select course outcomes.

No. of Credits: 1 towards Pharm.D.

Pre-Requisite: PHRC 4550, PHRC 5350, and PHRC 5570

Description: The College of Pharmacy Seminar course is the culmination of the student’s medical information evaluation skills pathway. In this course students will research a given topic, develop a scientific paper describing research outcomes, create a professional poster, and deliver a platform presentation. The course will provide valuable experience in developing presentation skills and medical information resource utilization.

No. of Credits: 1 towards Pharm.D.

Pre-Requisite: None

Description: This is the third of three in the patient care management (PCM) sequence of laboratories. PCM III covers the following specific Pharmacotherapeutic topics, parallel to those in PHRC 6440: infectious diseases, including HIV, and cancer, with a focus on health-system pharmacy. The weekly classroom component of the course, Theory, exposes students to interprofessional interactions, patient encounters and additional exercises to compliment laboratory activities. Students will have the opportunity to hone communication skills, in both simulated inpatient and outpatient settings. Team building activities are incorporated throughout the course to enhance professionalism and communication skills amongst healthcare professionals. The laboratory uses realistic, integrated patient cases that allow students to draw upon knowledge acquired from all other courses in the curriculum. Cases encompass therapeutic, communication, legal, and social behavioral issues. Patient care plans are systematically documented and communicated based on patient cases. This course emphasizes decision-making processes that allow pharmacy students to integrate their knowledge and skills in an interactive learning environment. Physical assessment techniques and interpretation are interwoven into the laboratory sessions. The weekly classroom component of the course, Theory, provides students with interprofessional interactions, patient encounters and additional active learning exercises to compliment laboratory activities. Students are assessed for their knowledge of commonly used medications throughout the course

No. of Credits: 3 towards Pharm. D. and M.S.B.I. (Accepted as PHRE 5411 - Current Topics in Pharmacy Practice)

Pre-Requisite: None

Description: This is an elective course designed as a student/self directed course. In consultation with the chosen advisor/mentor and the course director, the student will determine a focused topic of quasi-independent study, research, or other appropriate learning activity. A final paper or other appropriate document(s) will serve as documentation of having met the mutually agreed upon objectives.

Learning Objectives:

  • Individualized

No. of Credits: 3 towards M.S.B.I.

Pre-Requisite: None

Description: This on-line course is an introduction to the management of employees in health care organizations. Students will gain a working knowledge of how to manage personal, interpersonal, and group processes by having the interpersonal skills to assume responsibility for leading and promoting teamwork among diverse stakeholders. Students will learn to manage individual and group behaviors in improving organizational productivity and performance. Through experiential learning, students will learn to integrate home, work, and educational observations and experiences and to convert them into proactive practical applications for growth and renewal.

Learning Objectives:

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • Evaluate basic concepts of organizational behavior and organizational development,
  • Critique the major theories of organizational behavior, including McGregor, Maslow, Herzberg, McClelland, Blake and Mouton, Fiedler, Vroom, Skinner and Alderfer,
  • Assess basic behavioral models of communication, motivation, performance organizational learning and development, and leadership,
  • Analyze his/her leadership/management style,
  • Synthesize the structure and dynamics of the small group process, and
  • Appraise the fundamentals and strategies of organizational change.

No. of Credits: 3 towards M.S.B.I

A list of availble electives can be found at http://osteopathic.nova.edu/msbi/ms-biomedical-informatics.html 

Semester Total: 13 Pharm.D. Credits (5 courses), 9 M.S.B.I. Credits (3 courses)

FOURTH YEAR

Summer/Fall/Winter Semester

No. of Credits: 4 towards Pharm.D.

Pre-Requisite: None

Description: The Internal Medicine Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience (APPE) is a four week, full time (minimum 40 hours per week) out-of-classroom supervised in-patient experience emphasizing non-distributive, direct-patient care and clinical aspects of pharmacy practice. The Internal Medicine APPE is designed to further refine skills in therapeutics, pharmacokinetics, drug information retrieval and evaluation, verbal and written communication, patient assessment and case presentations as they apply to adult patients. Students apply therapeutic knowledge, identify drug-related problems, develop competency in pharmacy practice, and enhance knowledge of disease management of common diseases such as hypertension, congestive heart failure, diabetes, renal failure, etc. As members of a health care team, students apply these principles while developing effective, least toxic, most economical pharmacological regimens and establishing caring patient relationships in an inpatient setting.

No. of Credits: 4 towards Pharm.D.

Pre-Requisite: None

Description: The Ambulatory Care Pharmacy Practice Experience (APPE) is a four week, full time (minimum 40 hours per week) out-of-classroom supervised experience emphasizing non-distributive, direct-patient care and clinical aspects of caring for pharmacy patients in the ambulatory care setting. Students will actively participate in obtaining patient medical and medication histories, evaluating drug therapies, developing pharmacy care plans, assessing patients, monitoring patients' therapeutic outcomes, consulting with other health care providers, and providing education to patients and health care professionals. Students will apply and synthesize didactic information to the activities of a pharmacist as they develop their professional maturity and judgment skills. Students apply therapeutic knowledge, identify drug-related problems, develop competency in pharmacy practice, and enhance knowledge of disease management of common diseases such as hypertension, venous thromboembolism, diabetes, hyperlipidemia, etc. As members of a health care team, students apply these principles while developing effective, least toxic, most economical pharmacological regimens and establishing caring patient relationships in an ambulatory care setting.

No. of Credits: 4 towards Pharm.D.

Pre-Requisite: None

Description: The Community Patient Care I Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience is the first of two 4-week, full time (minimum 40 hours per week) out-of-classroom supervised experiences emphasizing direct-patient care in the outpatient, community setting. In this APPE, students will apply and synthesize didactic information to the activities of a pharmacist as they develop their professional maturity and judgment skills. Students will select one specialty from multiple offerings to complete this requirement. The course focuses on technical skills in the distribution of prescriptions and the practice of medication therapy management.

No. of Credits: 4 towards Pharm.D.

Pre-Requisite: None

Description: The Community Patient Care II Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience is the second of two 4-week, full time (minimum 40 hours per week) out-of-classroom supervised experiences emphasizing direct-patient care in the outpatient, community setting. In this APPE, students will apply and synthesize didactic information to the activities of a pharmacist as they develop their professional maturity and judgment skills. Students will select one specialty from multiple offerings to complete this requirement. The course focuses on technical skills in the distribution of prescriptions and the practice of medication therapy management.

No. of Credits: 4 towards Pharm.D.

Pre-Requisite: None

Description: The Acute Patient Care I Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience is the first of two 4-week, full time (minimum 40 hours per week) out-of-classroom supervised experiences emphasizing direct-patient care in the inpatient, acute setting. In this APPE, students will apply and synthesize didactic information to the activities of a pharmacist as they develop their professional maturity and judgment skills. Students will select one specialty from multiple offerings to complete this requirement. Students will be exposed to the role and responsibilities of a professionally oriented pharmacist. Students participate as active members of a health care team.

No. of Credits: 4 towards Pharm.D.

Pre-Requisite: None

Description: The Acute Patient Care II Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience is the second of two 4-week, full time (minimum 40 hours per week) out-of-classroom supervised experiences emphasizing direct-patient care in the inpatient, acute setting. In this APPE, students will apply and synthesize didactic information to the activities of a pharmacist as they develop their professional maturity and judgment skills. Students will select one specialty from multiple offerings to complete this requirement. Students will be exposed to the role and responsibilities of a professionally oriented pharmacist. Students participate as active members of a health care team.

No. of Credits: 4 towards Pharm.D.

Pre-Requisite: None

Description: The Selective Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience is the a four-week, full time (minimum 40 hours per week) out-of-classroom supervised experience, which may emphasize direct- or nondirect-patient care in an outpatient, inpatient, or office-based setting. The student completes a total of three selective (elective) experiences in a pharmacy practice specialty area that will allow students to obtain broader experiences. Elective experiences include, but are not limited to, administration, advanced hospital cardiology, critical care, drug information, geriatrics, home infusion, informatics, managed care, medication therapy management, nutritional support, pediatrics, pharmacokinetics, psychiatry, research and veterinary pharmacy.

No. of Credits: 4 towards Pharm.D.

Pre-Requisite: None

Description: The Selective Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience is the a four-week, full time (minimum 40 hours per week) out-of-classroom supervised experience, which may emphasize direct- or nondirect-patient care in an outpatient, inpatient, or office-based setting. The student completes a total of three selective (elective) experiences in a pharmacy practice specialty area that will allow students to obtain broader experiences. Elective experiences include, but are not limited to, administration, advanced hospital cardiology, critical care, drug information, geriatrics, home infusion, informatics, managed care, medication therapy management, nutritional support, pediatrics, pharmacokinetics, psychiatry, research and veterinary pharmacy.

No. of Credits: 4 towards Pharm.D. and M.S.B.I. (Accepted as PHRC 7690 - APPE - Selective III)

Pre-Requisite: MI 5200, and HIPAA modules are prerequisites for this course. In addition, CITI certification is required for research projects. The course director may also require specific electives to be completed depending on the nature of the project that the student chooses to perform.

Description: This is a required course for all MSBI students. The practicum allows the student to select an area of interest in which to apply the theories, concepts, knowledge, and skills gained during the didactic courses in a real-world setting. The student will work under the supervision of a site-based preceptor and an NSU-based faculty advisor.

The student is expected to acquire skills and experiences in the application of basic biomedical informatics concepts and specialty knowledge to the solution of health information technology (HIT) problems. Students will be actively involved in the development, implementation, or evaluation of an informatics-based application or project.

A specific set of measurable learning objectives and deliverables will be determined by the student, the site preceptor, and the NSU-based faculty advisor. These learning objectives must be approved by the course director. The student’s area of interest would be determined at an earlier point in the program or by the needs of the precepting organization.

The practicum is evaluated by completion of an ePortfolio. The ePortfolio is an evidence based digital format method to assess the quality and quantity of learning gained from a student practicum experience. The ePortfolio is standardized in its structure and format yet individualized in its content for each student. Overall, the ePortfolio is a goal-driven documentation of professional growth and achieved competencies during the practicum. The ePortfolio combines self-reflection, instructor assessments, and documentation supplied by students (evidence/samples) to document what they learned/produced, and is used to help students prepare for career transition/development.

Students are responsible for finding their own practicum site. Once a site is located, the Program Office will facilitate a legal affiliation agreement between the site and the Program. Some practicum sites may require background checks, drug screening, and immunization records. Students are responsible for any associated costs.

Learning Objectives:

  • Individualized

No. of Credits: 0

Pre-Requisite: PHRC 6440

Description: The primary goal for the Curricular Review course series is to assess and strengthen student knowledge and skills developed during the four-year pharmacy curriculum. In Curricular Review I, students will start preparing for the NAPLEX by completing assigned practice questions and doing a practice NAPLEX-like exam.

No. of Credits: 0

Pre-Requisite: PHRC 6440

Description: In this course, students will continue preparing for the NAPLEX by completing assigned practice problems in the areas of pharmacotherapy and by completing several practice NAPLEX-like examinations.

No. of Credits: 0

Pre-Requisite: PHRC 6440

Description: Students will continue preparing for the NAPLEX by completing assigned practice problems and by completing a required pre-NAPLEX examination. Students will be provided with an individual pre-Naplex ID for one time use. During the on-campus portion of the course, a NAPLEX review course is provided.

No. of Credits: 3 towards M.S.B.I

A list of availble electives can be found at http://osteopathic.nova.edu/msbi/ms-biomedical-informatics.html 

Year Total: 36 Pharm.D. Credits (12 courses), 7 M.S.B.I. Credits (2 courses)

Classes

Courses taught by the College of Pharmacy consist of a variety of teaching methodologies including didactic lectures, simulation laboratories and on-site patient care experiences. Students work independently and in teams to learn the essential knowledge and skills of providing pharmaceutical care.

Courses offered by the Master of Science in Biomedical Informatics are taught using both on-line and on-site teaching methodologies. M.S.B.I. students must also complete a practicum experience in a Health Informatics.

Tuition

Tuition is determined by the university and may change from year to year. The tuition for the College of Pharmacy is based on a set fee for the semester, while the tuition for the Master of Science in Biomedical Informatics program is per credit hour. Courses taught through the College of Pharmacy (designated by PHRC / PHRE / PHRL course number) will be charged through the semester fee, while courses taught through the Biomedical Informatics Program (designated by MI course number) will be charged by the credit hour. All students participating in this program will receive a special HPD discount. The discount applied will be $100 per credit hour for each Master of Science in Biomedical Informatics course taken. Students completing the M.S.B.I. curriculum as outlined will be charged for 40 of the 43 credit hours required to complete the M.S.B.I.

Financial Aid

Student financial aid is based upon the primary degree program in which the student is enrolled. Students are not eligible for support during a time period when they are not enrolled in a course from their primary degree. To ensure that students taking the concurrent programs are eligible for aid throughout their academic program, the curriculum has been structured to require a Pharmacy course in each time period of active enrollment. 

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